With
the cold weather beginning to settle in across Connecticut, many
people think that their opportunities for outdoor exercise will be
limited until next spring. While the thought of exercising in cold
weather is unappealing for some, it is completely healthy as long as
your take these safety precautions.

Layer Up

Exercising
in cold weather can be a bit tricky, as physical activity causes the
body to generate a lot of heat, making it feel warmer than it really
is. However, once you start sweating, the evaporation of the sweat
and windchill factor can cool you off rather quickly. The solution?
Dress in layers.
Your
base layer should be a synthetic material, such as polypropylene,
which draws the sweat away from your body. Avoid cotton, which stays
wet. Your top layer should be fleece or wool to keep you warm – add
or remove these layers as needed to keep comfortable. And don’t
forget a hat!
More than 50% of your body heat is lost through
your head, a knit cap is critical for exercising in the cold.

Remember to Stretch

Stretching
is always an important step in any workout, but it is even more
critical in cold weather because our muscles tend to stiffen, leaving
them susceptible to tears and strains. Stretching should not be done
as your warm up, but after your warm up. Warm up with a light aerobic activity, then stretch out your muscles before you dive into your workout.

Know the Signs of
Frostbite and Hypothermia

Hypothermia
and frostbite are the two biggest dangers of cold weather, so it is
important that you can identify the symptoms associated with both.
Although the chances of frostbite are less than 5% in weather 5° F
or warmer, it is important to be prepared. Here are the early signs
of each:
  • Frostbite: Numbness
    or stinging sensation on exposed body parts, such as your ears,
    nose, cheeks, and hands. If you begin to experience this, get out of
    the cold as soon as possible and warm up the affected areas.
  • Hypothermia:
    Hypothermia occurs when your
    core body temperature drops below 95° F. Hypothermia can cause poor
    judgment, lack of consciousness, and even death in severe cases. If you
    begin to experience intense shivering, fatigue, and loss of
    coordination, stop exercising immediately and seek medical
    attention.

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Insports is an indoor multi-sport facility located in Trumbull, Connecticut. We are home to the area’s largest indoor turf field, as well as numerous hardwood courts. We host year-round leagues, tournaments, camps, and clinics for a variety of sports, visit our website to learn more.